The power of a WBS…

Shortcut to get to a full project overview and develop integrated management plan

Project management is a complex skill/art to master. It is my endeavor to assist those new to the field to gain “hindsight” driven insight into what makes projects more successful.

Today we are going to discuss a reasonably technical element – Work Breakdown Structures (WBS).

The name is even daunting, but I can assure you that it is quite simple once you have grasped the concept, and the benefits are numerous and powerful.

So what is it?

What does it do?

How can it help me?

The way in which you should approach this is as follow:

  • Can I break up my project into smaller (logical) pieces? E.g. if you bake a cake you can separate preparation, baking and decorating quite easily.
  • Ok now if we look at these pieces, are there logical pieces inside of them? E.g. in preparation there are 2 other pieces – wet ingredients and dry ingredients that have to be mixed separately (depending on the recipe of course)
  • Carry on until it stops making sense or all the pieces have been broken up into elements.
  • If I ignore outside influences, what do I – and my team – have to do to achieve success in each of the lowest pieces? E.g. all the dry ingredients have to be mixed BEFORE the wet ingredients. As a general rule, you will now be in the task or actions level where stuff has to done by people.
  • If it becomes clear that you may have missed a piece (measure the ingredients) simply add them in on the level that makes the most sense.

wbs1

What has happened here is astonishing:

  • You have actually planned the work that would be required to achieve the overall goal in a structure and logical manner
  • You have determined what has to be done in some sequence (e.g. measure before mix)
  • You can see where tasks can occur simultaneously (e.g. switch on the oven and gather ingredients)
  • You know that there are dependencies (e.g. you cannot pour the dough into the baking pan before you have greased the pan.
  • You have an idea of the time (work and duration), the number of resources (ingredients, equipment, and people) and sequence of events – I would call that a basic schedule with time and cost management capability.
  • You know what can be measured – when, where, who… – I would call that a quality and milestone plan you may even want to base your communications plan on this…

I know this sounds like stuff you have heard of before, but if you do this early enough (it’s never too late) in your project, you will be able to isolate the areas that you and your team are not too clear about. You can now focus on these areas to gain the knowledge or information required to properly plan – I’m so sorry, would this be your risk log?

I promise you just knowing what you don’t know is justification enough to do the exercise.

Every document and tool (e.g. Project Charter, Scope of work, Schedule, Resources plan, Communications plan, Quality plan, Risk / Issue management plan, Cost management plan) now have a BACKBONE from which they can be developed.

If the WBS is used in developing your project management infrastructure, you will discover that you have an integrated management plan.

If that does not impress the boss??????

integrated-management

The most important benefit that the WBS provides a project team is – – – – UNDERSTANDING!

join-our-delivery-team-

Now you and your team simply have to get up, show up and execute…

Please follow, share and comment. I love to hear from you.

 

Rules about implementing a PMO

Implementing a PMO is a SIGNIFICANT undertaking for any organisation. Is the implementation of a PMO really worth it?

To start this post we have to clarify a few concepts. All of the specific definitions given may be contested but for the purposes of this post, I would like to utilize these descriptions as a foundation.

Definitions:

Project – A project in business and science is typically defined as a collaborative enterprise, frequently involving research or design, which is carefully planned to achieve a particular aim. Projects can be further defined as temporary rather than permanent social systems that are constituted by teams within or across organizations to accomplish particular tasks under time constraints. (wikipedia.org)

Program – A group of related projects, subprograms and program activities that are managed in a coordinated way to obtain benefits not available from managing them individually. (pmi.org)

Portfolio – Projects, programs, sub-portfolios, and operations managed as a group to achieve strategic objectives. (pmi.org)

Assumption:

PMO (Portfolio/Program/Project Management Office) as a concept is used interchangeably to denote any organisational construct that attempts to govern, administer or standardize project (used singularly to denote inclusion of Portfolio/Program/Project Management throughout this article) related activities with the intent to improve the success, benefit realization or efficiency obtained from these efforts.

Discussion:

There are two very contradicting, but real, statistics related to the project management industry/discipline. The first is the unquestionable advantage that disciplined project management provides in achieving short and medium-term goals, affecting change, mobilizing resources and converting resources and effort into value. The second undeniable reality is an alarming failure rate of projects. Much has and can be said about the failures, and it is probably one of the most enduring sources of research for professionals and practitioners.

I wish that I could sever PMO’s from these statements, but unfortunately, I could not do it with a clear conscience.

Most of the PMO’s I have been exposed to are an attempt to overcome the realities like – governance practices afforded only lip-service, resources over-allocated and multi-tasked, project sponsors invisible and project commitments made without proper planning or justification – “normal” project management environments.

Online Business Cycle

The Rules:

  • A PMO cannot address business problems from outside the business. If you have a problem with squirrels, putting down all the rats you can find will not solve the problem. Similarly, addressing problems with project governance will not be solved by implementing a PMO; it would probably just make things worse. If you have a business problem, resolve it using the appropriate business methodologies and practices.
  • Project Management maturity cannot be achieved by implementing a PMO – Teaching a seven-year-old all the principles of medical diagnostics does not make a doctor. Management maturity and skills can only be achieved through – exposure, training, hiring, failure and other similar actions. Only by learning from mistakes and responding in a prevention orientated way, will organizations gain the experiences which then provide maturity.
  • PMO’s do not provide instant results – You cannot build an ocean liner by converting a houseboat. The design, implementation, and embedding of a PMO consume resources (hopefully high-quality i.e. expensive resources) that can only be recovered on in the tactical or strategic realm. The PMO will have to steadily grow into a value-adding entity OR the organization has to realize that value is obtained from combining benefits yielded by contributing processes at least in the early life stages of the PMO.
  • PMO’s don’t survive cold boardroom air exposure – A losing team can be inspired by the addition of a single player, but it will not overcome dependency on that player until the original team members acquire new skills. Implemented PMO’s HAVE to permeate every level of the organization involved in project management, and it has to become the unquestionable mechanism of choice from the executives to the shop floor – every man and his dog have to understand their contribution or requirement. If it is only used and promoted by senior staff it will die.
  • PMO’s work like web sites – Any programmer can develop the Google landing page in a matter of minutes. However, one millimeter behind the screen there are servers, and processes that consume vast resources that allow Google to conduct the search, filter results and respond with relevant information. This is also true of PMO’s – setting up an office, hiring people, setting down standards and processes is the landing page; getting those processes and standards to work and return relevant results will consume vast resources, require hard work and know-how.
  • PMO Accountability – PMO’s cannot be held accountable for project execution success if they have no say in which projects get selected, who the project managers are and which project manager is executing which project. Beating the teacher because of a high failure rate of a poorly defined course.

The achievement of a working PMO is the pinnacle of project management. The benefits that can be achieved through getting it right can be compared to the introduction of production line manufacturing into the automobile industry.

The implementation of a PMO can easily be likened to changing an automobile manufacturer that produces handcrafted wood frame vehicles into a production line that produces metal frame vehicles. Many different things will have to change. Think of the impact the following concepts will have on the business culture of the organization experiencing the change – tolerances, specialization, supply lines, parts inventory, production floor management techniques, quality control and assurance, production throughput management, process sequencing, etc.

Summary:

Implementing a PMO is a SIGNIFICANT undertaking for any organization irrespective of size or market and should be considered in the order group of implementing a project management production (not just assembly) line into the organization.

business_stats

Is the implementation of a PMO really worth it?

Ask any major automobile manufacturer.

– Unquestionably and Irrevocably –

YES

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Portfolio, Program and Project Management

From a distance, it seems that people use these terms interchangeably. They do however represent many different undertakings.

Trying to steer away from the “official” definitions provided by the various project management institutes and organizations I hope to explain it in a way that would be easily understood, and can be agreed upon by all professionals in the field.


Definitions:

Project Management – the discipline of planning, organizing, motivating, and controlling resources to meet specific goals. A project is a temporary undertaking with a defined beginning and end (usually time-constrained, and often constrained by funding or deliverable), undertaken to meet unique goals and objectives, typically to bring about beneficial change or added value. The temporary nature of projects stands in contrast with business as usual (or operations), which are repetitive, permanent, or semi-permanent functional activities to produce products or services. In practice, the management of these two systems is often quite different, and as such requires the development of distinct technical skills and management strategies. (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Project_management)

Program Management – the process of managing several related projects, often with the intention of improving an organization’s performance. In practice and in its aims it is often closely related to systems engineering and industrial engineering. (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Program_management) I would like to add that it could temporarily include the management of areas that are business as usual (or operations). Programs are also focused on obtaining business benefit observable from outside the program environment.

Portfolio Management (Project Portfolio Management) – centralized management of processes, methods, and technologies used by project managers and project management offices (PMOs) to analyze and collectively manage a group of current or proposed projects based on numerous key characteristics. The objectives of PPM are to determine the optimal resource mix for delivery and to schedule activities to best achieve an organization’s operational and financial goals ― while honoring constraints imposed by customers, strategic objectives, or external real-world factors. (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Project_portfolio_management)

Just looking at these definitions does not distinguish large projects, from small programs, portfolios from very large programs and so on. So let’s look at what is different and then we should be able to tell them apart.

Finite Focus Components Related Objective
Project Yes Functional Delivery Yes Single
Program Yes Strategic Objectives Yes Multiple
Portfolio No Strategic Intent No Varied

This will give us some basis for comparison.

  • Portfolios do not have an end date
  • Portfolios are entirely strategic
  • Portfolios contain projects, programs, and operations that do not require a specific relationship to each other
  • Portfolios don’t intend to reach a specific strategic objective, but rather address a strategic value or intent
  • Programs have a specific strategic goal that it must satisfy
  • All components in a program are included to deliver or contribute to reaching a measurable strategic goal (Could be more than 1)
  • Programs may temporarily include the management of operations
  • Programs have a start and end date within which they have to deliver on the agreed objectives
  • Projects deliver a specific outcome (product, result)

Example:

A specific aircraft manufacturer has a project portfolio in which they intend to enhance the organization’s image, improve service delivery and secure the medium and long term financial future. Within this project portfolio, a program exists to design, develop and implement the manufacturing of a new aircraft. The program contains many projects, one of which is concerned with the building of the manufacturing facility in which the aircraft will be built.

Now that this picture is becoming clear -> I have a gift…

Sorry I simply had to include this graphic J it just keeps on growing…

Please ask questions, offer differing views and comment at will.

Follow this blog, share, link, spread the news…

Have a great day.

Introducing Agile into business – Affordably

One of the most revolutionary and exciting events in recent business management history has been the introduction of agile management techniques into the business environment. (outside of IT)

agile

However, through our experience, this has come at the expense of “proper planning” of work with specific reference to the attainment of business value aligned to a strategy.

Secondly, many organizations have not been able to respond by updating their Governance, Risk, and Compliance (GRC) frameworks which leaves them vulnerable during audits.

Thirdly, Company executives are only now warming up to work breakdown structures (WBS), Gantt charts, and multi-year program budgets.

The disruption advantage that Agile provides practitioners is translated as risk and unstructured (unplanned) work by executives (and auditors). The current “language barrier”  between Agile practice and acceptable business communication is significant and the reporting produced does not provide them with the insight they desire.

It is in exactly this space that we would like to introduce our company’s products and services.

If only there was a tool that allows all of these elements to work seamlessly together on the same data. Why can’t we have a system that can show an Agile Scrum Kanban board in a Gantt chart format? Why can’t we show our burndown chart in a Gantt baseline format, our resource utilization as well as capacity planning in an easy way?

Now there is…

Note: We only offer products and services that return below 12 month ROI as well as deliver measurable and directly attributable value to your organization from the outset.

One of the professional services we render is a rapid business and project planning rectification program. We unfold the fundamental principles of how to plan appropriately (irrespective of the methodology used) which usually reside within your employee development program.

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The products below allow the management of agile projects and events within a structured format, at an implemented price that could conceivably be lower than your current system’s annual renewal. We have provided hyperlinks to each product in the graphic to allow you to browse the features and pricing of the product.

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Easy-Redmine-728x90

Obviously, these systems offer significantly more benefits that we have not highlighted in this post. We can assure you that there are several very good reasons the fine organizations listed below elected to utilize these products.

clients

Do not delay – Contact us today – future-trust.net@future-trust.net.

Project Management 102

Post aimed at positioning and considering standards and approaches to manage projects. It takes a look into phases, knowledge areas with some detail.

You should already know that you have a project and you can do some planning to get things done – From the previous post – Project Management 101.

Now moving swiftly along…

There are many standards and approaches available to manage projects: (From Wikipedia)

Approaches

International Standards

There have been several attempts to develop project management standards, such as:

For clarity sake, we will only delve into one of these “flavors” of project management – Project Management Institute (PMI). The most important next step in your discovery of what project management revolves around phases.

Phases
Phases

The phases are intended to allow us mortal beings to group things together logically that will allow us the greatest chance of succeeding. We have to remember that some learning and bitter experiences have contributed to the knowledge that constitutes the groupings.

Initiation

You have to know a few things before you really start to attack a project. These things are absolutely vital to the success of the project.

  • What MUST the project achieve (not from the project’s view, but from the client’s view)?
  • How many funds are available to achieve what (and how will you be able to get it – what does the project have to do)?
  • Who are the people involved (probably the list of stakeholders already identified in Project Management 101)?
  • Get written signed approval of your understanding of what the project has to achieve (project charter).
New Team - Fresh Young...
New Team – Fresh Young…

Planning and Design

We have discussed planning before, why again now? In Project Management 101 we explained planning to give you enough detail to define the project. In this phase, you will have to plan to achieve the results… You have to plan to an “appropriate level of detail” to allow you to manage project risk by estimating the time, resources, cost and other factors that will affect the chances of delivering the project successfully. (more on project planning)

Planning Discussions....
Planning Discussions…

Executing

Do the work that you said that you were going to do in the planning phase. This is where the tire hits tar, things get serious and things will have to happen…

  • People will have to know who does what when, why and for how long…
  • They have to work hard (I can almost guarantee you that you will not have enough time or people to get all the stuff done),
  • They will have to be accurate and precise (cannot re-do stuff here),
  • You will have to do it cheaply (yes, I know – haha).
Getting it Done....
Getting it Done…

Monitoring and Controlling

You have to constantly evaluate what people are doing…

  • Is it in line with what has been specified?
  • How do we overcome this unanticipated problem?
  • If we lose time doing this, how do we get it back?
  • If that thing now cost more than what we were told, how do we recover the extra expenditure?
  • If we pay more for a better person, will we save enough time to make it worth our while?
  • How does the client perceive all the activity?
Insider View...
Insider View…

Closing

One of three things will cause a project to close:

  • Achieved all of the project deliverables (YAY….. )
  • Stopped due to requirements shift (the reason why the project existed has changed or disappeared)
  • Will never reach the project deliverables (many reasons within and external to project can cause this)

Remember any project you can walk away from…

Project Team - Older Wiser...
Project Team – Older Wiser…

To give you some idea of how projects will tax you as they move through the phases, the line drawing below is a good approximation of how most projects behave.

Phase - Consumption
Phase – Consumption

Phew… Glad that’s over with… So I’m a fully-fledged project manager now?

Well yes and no…

To be a project manager you have to know a little bit of each of these:

The ten knowledge areas are: (Sixth Edition)

  • Project Integration Management
  • Project Scope management
  • Project Schedule Management
  • Project Cost Management
  • Project Quality Management
  • Project Resource Management
  • Project Communications Management
  • Project Risk Management
  • Project Procurement Management
  • Project Stakeholder Management

We will look at this next time…

Have to wait... for... more...
Have to wait… for… more…

Have a fantastic day…

Project Management – 101

You have just inherited something that everybody calls a project…

What do you do, where do you start?

Ok, so someone that you know knows someone that did a project once and you have just inherited something that everybody calls a project…

What do you do, where do you start?

This post is aimed at addressing the most basic elements of project management. These topics are:

  • What is a project?
  • What are the most important things to know?
  • What are the most important things to do?

Whoooooo… slow down…

Let’s make sure you are busy with a project…

NOTE: I have included project speak (terminology) in brackets and italics.

What is a project?

Ignoring all the well-defined definitions about what projects are, let us look at what it means to me and you…

Checklist:

  • Is this a one-time occurrence? (does not happen often or regularly)
  • Is there an agreed or understood set of outcomes or results?
  • Is there a time limit on achieving the result?
  • Is there funds or money (budget) allocated specifically to achieve the results?
  • Has a group of people been specifically tasked to achieve the results? (outside normal working situation)
  • Is there someone specific or a specific group that would receive the results?

If you can tick more than three of these, you have probably been infected by the project bug…

 

A new victim...
A new victim…

What are the most important things to know?

Obviously, there are some things you should know or have:

  • List of results or outcomes (deliverables)
  • Know when the outcomes should be delivered or completed (end date)
  • Understand how you can get your hands on the money (budget)
  • Know who is involved with the project (stakeholders)
  • Some knowledge of how these results can be achieved (content expertise)

Now that you have all this the most important rule of all – People = Results

Contrary to popular belief, projects are not about schedules, milestones or cost analysis…

It is about getting other people to help you achieve results

 

The real reason...
The real reason…

What are the most important things to do?

Have a meeting – ha-ha got you… Actually… it’s not that far off…

Look out here it comes… the most dreaded word in business today…

COMMUNICATE

Who should I communicate to? (Sorted in what I think represents an order of importance)

  • People that will receive the outcome, results, deliverables or benefits. (project clients)
  • People or person who hired or tasked you to do the project (project sponsor)
  • People who will assist you in achieving the deliverables (project team)
  • People not on the project that you will have to use to achieve the results e.g. Human Resources, Procurement (Project Stakeholder)
  • People who will make sure the project is on the right track e.g. Auditors, Steering Committee (Project Stakeholder)
  • Other people who are affected by the project OR can have some influence in achieving success (Project Stakeholder)

Make sure that you understand what the clients really want, how does that fit in with what the sponsor has asked you to deliver, does the team have to understand what needs to be done?

If you can simply get these communications bedded down, the project will immediately start going in the right direction.

 

Ideal project manager...
Ideal project manager…

So now that we have done the communications, we can simply sit back and watch the action… Where is my remote?

I’m so sorry… NO…

There is this other thing…

PLANNING

Planning is a way of figuring out the following: (a sequence that would work under the majority of conditions)

  • What do we need to achieve? It is very important to understand what you are expected to do and what you are not expected to do? What would fall “outside the project”? (project scope)
  • If there is a lot of work, chop it up into logical or sensible pieces. Arrange these pieces of work in a way that makes sense to all the people involved in making sure the project is a success (work breakdown structure – WBS).
  • Look at these pieces of work and decide which will have to be done first, because some pieces will need it to be in place before others can occur e.g. house walls must be erected before you can put a roof on. (sequential or logical arrangement)
  • Try and get an accurate understanding of how long (duration) each of these pieces of work will take to complete. Consider when the project has to be completed (end date) and try to work backward from there. (scheduling)
  • Now we can add people to these pieces of work (human resource management). Remember to include the people that you will have to hire in for expertise, workforce or any other reason.
  • We have a big pot of money (overall budget) that we should now divide between the work packages. Include what you have to buy (procurement), who or what you have rent (procurement and services management) as well as the people that will be working on the project’s salaries and wages. Add the unusual stuff like travel cost, hotels, visa’s, food, venue hire, insurance, furniture, … (Preliminary and General – P&G)
  • Making sure that each of the work packages delivers a usable and functional output is obviously important. How you and the project team will ensure that this is going to happen is called quality assurance.
  • If the project team can come up with a list of things that can go wrong (risk analysis), it would help a lot because you will then know what to look out for.
  • Amazing as it may sound the stakeholders will want to know how the project is doing. So we will need to find a way to communicate to all these people in a way that THEY can understand, on a regular basis…

Congratulations… You have completed a project plan…

 

Planning - How to...
Planning – How to…

But wait… some stuff doesn’t fit together… we don’t have enough people, money, time… OH MY GOODNESS…

Because you only have a certain amount of money (budget) to hire people and stuff (resources) to achieve the goals within a specific amount of time (duration), it is almost inevitable that there will not be enough of one these elements (constraints).

 

Project Management - Explained!!!
Project Management – Explained!!!

Welcome to project management…

Just a note…

 

Next time...
Next time…

Have a great day and remember to smile…

A Plan – What is it?

Everybody and I mean everybody, tell me, you and everybody to plan for… (Insert – the future, your life, career, love life…)

That leaves me with the question – Do you know what a plan is? I mean really understand what the different elements of a plan really are?

Definition: A plan is typically any diagram or list of steps with timing and resources, used to achieve an objective. It is commonly understood as a temporal set of intended actions through which one expects to achieve a goal. – Wikipedia

So from the definition above, we know that a plan should have:

  • Goal, Objective or outcome (list of deliverables)
  • List of steps or actions (May include logic like dependency and predecessors)
  • Time (Labour, elapsed time and duration)
  • Resources (human, capital, time and objects)
  • Value measurement (Quality statement and benefits)

If you have all this, it should all come together like:

Ta Daaaa… end of Lesson…. Thank you, come back next week…

Plans lead to success
Plans lead to success

But, I’m stuck over here:

Where to start a plan?
Where to start a plan?

I don’t know where to start… There is just soo much stuff… See:

Unplanned Plan
Unplanned Plan

It looks NOTHING like the plans they put forward…

Where do I start? What do I do?

Ok so, you twisted my arm.

Finding the right goal
Finding the right goal

Element 1 – Understanding the objective

Here are the most important steps to execute to end up having a plan (with all the good stuff inside).

You call this help? What does Scoping mean? Please translate this into ENGLISH…..

Step 1 – Know what you want. Know exactly what you want. Include the stuff that you don’t know to make sure that somewhere, you can build it into the plan where you make a decision once you fully understand if you want something or not. Most importantly – write this stuff down to allow you to come back and check against the original goal.

Step 2 – Look around and figure out what other people with similar problems have done. Get more than one possibility and be genuine in evaluating the level of success each of these possibilities offered. Most importantly – don’t discard anything now, you don’t know what the probability of success in your situation is.

Steps 3, 4 and 5 – Apply (theoretically) the possible solutions in your situation. Consider the impact, cost, duration and estimate how complex it would be to make it work. Most importantly – estimate what the realistic chances are to achieve success with each of these options.

Step 6 – It should become clear now that some of the solutions will work better than others for you in this situation. Select the one with the best chance of actually working. Most importantly – walk away from the discarded options and channel all your energy into making sure that the option you have selected will work.

Element 2 – Figure out what to do next

Amazing as this may sound, we have the capacity to build stuff in our minds and we can then work “backward in time” to get a clear roadmap or path to reach a goal.

Step 1 – Visualise the goal as if it has already been achieved. Make this picture as clear as you can. Take it to extremes like experiencing the emotions of achieving this objective; smell it, hear it, see the sun glinting… Most importantly – visualize the completed or finished result.

Step 2 – Get a realistic understanding of where you are now. Get honest, don’t soft-soap or be gentle. Most importantly – understand that this is your point of departure. You have nothing to be ashamed of. Many have achieved great things from starting in humility with nothing and little to no opportunities. You have already seen your future…

Step 3 – Find the shortest route to achieving the goal. I cannot stress this enough… Most importantly – the shortest route requiring the least amount of resources and time almost always returns the best results. Things like motivation, endurance, and determination become significant issues when you travel the scenic route…

Step 4 – Identify the big moments. On this road that you are about to travel, you should find places where you can “stop and recuperate”. It is almost exactly the same as driving a long distance. You need moments to just stop and reflect. Most importantly – choose the rest spots looking back from the goal to the starting point. This perspective will allow you to see things as if they have already occurred and your perception of these rest-spots will result and not problem orientated.

Step 5 – Fill in the gaps. Now that you know what the main moments are; fill in the details from where you are now to the first big moment. It is almost impossible not to start filling in the blanks between the next moments. Most importantly – just get enough detail down between the next moments to stop wondering about them. Focus on getting the detail of reaching the next moment. Understand that you will have to repeat this step every time you reach one of the big moments.

Elements 3, 4 and 5 – Time, resources and value are related

Now for the big surprise…. These three things are interrelated and interdependent. So if you want to travel from point A to point B very fast, you will need a fast car, which cost lots of money. Should you want to get there in style, well those cars are expensive too. If you are the champagne, caviar, and first-class jet set; I hope that you understand we are talking big money now.

You may elect to go the dirt cheap road and simply arrive at point B; you have to pace yourself here… Both ways… Most importantly – choose the car well. Too expensive and you don’t have enough money to make it to the end; too cheap and the car may not see the end…

So you need to look at the items listed in the “what to do next” section and attach time, money and resources to each one…

End Game

If you have written down all the stuff that you have decided, elected and seen, you will now be in possession of something that will answer these questions:

  • What
  • How
  • When
  • Where
  • Who

Congratulations – You are now the proud owner of a well designed, well thought through plan that presents a very high probability of success. You will now be able to communicate clearly to yourself and others what you are doing and why; know when to do what as well as constantly know what will happen next.

Welcome to the world where you can now say to other people…..

You are a winner
You are a winner

I hope you enjoy this journey and would like to invite you to comment, share and splash this around…