Cover your *ss project management

This would make up the absolute minimum documentation, controls and management processes you need to control a project.

There are probably thousands of articles and papers written about what is essential in managing a project. This article will focus on gaining a semblance of control.

Projects are complex constructs that for the most part drives us into the unknown (see Project Management – 101 to make sure you have a project). I believe that the PMBOK ® is one of the most comprehensive descriptions of the art and skill known as project management.

However, my writings are focused on the learning and growing project management practitioners (maybe even some professionals) out there that may consider advice from someone doing this for a living.

For controlling or managing projects the 10 knowledge areas defined are: (names may change to protect the innocent :-))

So if you are starting out – this must be daunting, even intimidating.

Let’s have a look at what would be the absolute minimum that you would need to deliver any sort of project successfully.

  • Why? – You need to understand (not necessarily document) why this project exists in the first place.
  • What? – What is the intended result (s)? (This you definitely need to document)
  • When? – The intended result is needed by a specific time for a reason (Document)
  • How? – Is there some planning or though in existence as to how the result should / must be achieved? (Document)
  • Who? – This is a multi-layered question as it includes: (Document)
    • Intended recipients – the people who need to live with the consequences
    • Sponsor(s) – People or organization paying for the project
    • Team – People or organization that will make it happen
    • Stakeholders – Everybody affected in any way with either the project or the consequences of the project
  • How Much? – Cost is one of the most important aspects of project management and is a success / fail criteria that will be applied to measure the project (Document)

Remember the rule – Good, Fast, Cheap: You Can Only Pick Two!

GOOD-FAST-CHEAP

Ok from the info you should have now you can create all the documentation and processes you need to effectively manage a project.

RULE: Size matters in Project Management – The bigger, the more documentation, controls, and management you will need to manage the beast!!!

Documentation:

(I use interchangeable descriptors of documents that do vastly different things in a formal environment to explain the functionality that needs to be achieved.)

  • Most important is a Project Charter / Project Scope / Specification document – This is simply a written agreement between you and all the people involved that describes what has to be achieved, by what time, using which resources and costing X much. (Sponsors usually have to sign this to ensure that they pay for it.)
  • Project Plan / Schedule / Deliverable list with delivery dates – This describes what has to be done by what time, by whom, costing this much. Usually described as tasks or work packages, it is an attempt to guess what would happen in the future.
  • Billing / Payment agreement – You have to ensure that you can get the funds required before you need it.
  • Pay-out mechanism – You need to be able to pay those that render services and goods to your project.
  • Communication plan/strategy – Communication and reporting are essential to the success of almost any project. Make sure you understand how you need to communicate to whom by when with what content.

This would make up the absolute minimum documentation, controls and management processes you need to control a project.

Controlling the project from this basis becomes much easier.

 

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All you have to do is make sure everybody does what they are supposed to do, communicate to those that require it and DELIVER BABY – DELIVER…

Have a fantastic day – follow the blog and share this 2 or 3 thousand people 😉

Portfolio, Program and Project Management

From a distance, it seems that people use these terms interchangeably. They do however represent many different undertakings.

Trying to steer away from the “official” definitions provided by the various project management institutes and organizations I hope to explain it in a way that would be easily understood, and can be agreed upon by all professionals in the field.


Definitions:

Project Management – the discipline of planning, organizing, motivating, and controlling resources to meet specific goals. A project is a temporary undertaking with a defined beginning and end (usually time-constrained, and often constrained by funding or deliverable), undertaken to meet unique goals and objectives, typically to bring about beneficial change or added value. The temporary nature of projects stands in contrast with business as usual (or operations), which are repetitive, permanent, or semi-permanent functional activities to produce products or services. In practice, the management of these two systems is often quite different, and as such requires the development of distinct technical skills and management strategies. (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Project_management)

Program Management – the process of managing several related projects, often with the intention of improving an organization’s performance. In practice and in its aims it is often closely related to systems engineering and industrial engineering. (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Program_management) I would like to add that it could temporarily include the management of areas that are business as usual (or operations). Programs are also focused on obtaining business benefit observable from outside the program environment.

Portfolio Management (Project Portfolio Management) – centralized management of processes, methods, and technologies used by project managers and project management offices (PMOs) to analyze and collectively manage a group of current or proposed projects based on numerous key characteristics. The objectives of PPM are to determine the optimal resource mix for delivery and to schedule activities to best achieve an organization’s operational and financial goals ― while honoring constraints imposed by customers, strategic objectives, or external real-world factors. (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Project_portfolio_management)

Just looking at these definitions does not distinguish large projects, from small programs, portfolios from very large programs and so on. So let’s look at what is different and then we should be able to tell them apart.

Finite Focus Components Related Objective
Project Yes Functional Delivery Yes Single
Program Yes Strategic Objectives Yes Multiple
Portfolio No Strategic Intent No Varied

This will give us some basis for comparison.

  • Portfolios do not have an end date
  • Portfolios are entirely strategic
  • Portfolios contain projects, programs, and operations that do not require a specific relationship to each other
  • Portfolios don’t intend to reach a specific strategic objective, but rather address a strategic value or intent
  • Programs have a specific strategic goal that it must satisfy
  • All components in a program are included to deliver or contribute to reaching a measurable strategic goal (Could be more than 1)
  • Programs may temporarily include the management of operations
  • Programs have a start and end date within which they have to deliver on the agreed objectives
  • Projects deliver a specific outcome (product, result)

Example:

A specific aircraft manufacturer has a project portfolio in which they intend to enhance the organization’s image, improve service delivery and secure the medium and long term financial future. Within this project portfolio, a program exists to design, develop and implement the manufacturing of a new aircraft. The program contains many projects, one of which is concerned with the building of the manufacturing facility in which the aircraft will be built.

Now that this picture is becoming clear -> I have a gift…

Sorry I simply had to include this graphic J it just keeps on growing…

Please ask questions, offer differing views and comment at will.

Follow this blog, share, link, spread the news…

Have a great day.

Introducing Agile into business – Affordably

One of the most revolutionary and exciting events in recent business management history has been the introduction of agile management techniques into the business environment. (outside of IT)

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However, through our experience, this has come at the expense of “proper planning” of work with specific reference to the attainment of business value aligned to a strategy.

Secondly, many organizations have not been able to respond by updating their Governance, Risk, and Compliance (GRC) frameworks which leaves them vulnerable during audits.

Thirdly, Company executives are only now warming up to work breakdown structures (WBS), Gantt charts, and multi-year program budgets.

The disruption advantage that Agile provides practitioners is translated as risk and unstructured (unplanned) work by executives (and auditors). The current “language barrier”  between Agile practice and acceptable business communication is significant and the reporting produced does not provide them with the insight they desire.

It is in exactly this space that we would like to introduce our company’s products and services.

If only there was a tool that allows all of these elements to work seamlessly together on the same data. Why can’t we have a system that can show an Agile Scrum Kanban board in a Gantt chart format? Why can’t we show our burndown chart in a Gantt baseline format, our resource utilization as well as capacity planning in an easy way?

Now there is…

Note: We only offer products and services that return below 12 month ROI as well as deliver measurable and directly attributable value to your organization from the outset.

One of the professional services we render is a rapid business and project planning rectification program. We unfold the fundamental principles of how to plan appropriately (irrespective of the methodology used) which usually reside within your employee development program.

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The products below allow the management of agile projects and events within a structured format, at an implemented price that could conceivably be lower than your current system’s annual renewal. We have provided hyperlinks to each product in the graphic to allow you to browse the features and pricing of the product.

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Obviously, these systems offer significantly more benefits that we have not highlighted in this post. We can assure you that there are several very good reasons the fine organizations listed below elected to utilize these products.

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Do not delay – Contact us today – future-trust.net@future-trust.net.